FEZZIWIG'S WAREHOUSE DANCE PARTY

AT THE DICKENS CHRISTMAS FAIR

    

 Dancing at Fezziwig's

Couple Dances Set Dances Mixers Other Dance Etiquette
         
Waltz

 

At Fezziwig’s, we dance the early Victorian rotary, or turning, waltz, which turns exclusively to the right. For both historical and safety reasons, we do not do left turns at Fezziwig’s. Unlike those adventurous Americans, Europeans didn’t start reversing the waltz, as modern Viennese waltzers do, until the 20th century. A late 1960’s episode of the classic British television show “The Avengers” actually suggests that reversing the waltz was considered a bit daring even then! But, more to the point, the left-turning waltz takes up more space than our warehouse “ballroom” has room for and we know from experience what a safety hazard just one careless left-turning couple can be in a room full of right-turning couples.

Additionally, we do not cross-step waltz. This is another modern innovation and travels at a different rate than the rotary waltz making it incompatible with the Fezziwig’s floor.

To avoid dizziness in the waltz, you may either guide your partner into open waltz variations (taking care to avoid too many twirls, of course) or into skaters’ position, but please do resist the temptation to reverse.

Cavalry Gallopede

The Call: Honored guests, please take partners and form long ways sets to learn and dance the Cavalry Gallopede.

The Instructions: This is a Military dance, and WE will be your Captains. Follow our lead, and we'll lead you through safely. Now I'll talk you through the dance and then off we go. Take hands along the set, advance, bow and/or curtsy and retire. Now draw sabers and Charge across the set, passing by the right shoulder. Turn and dress your lines, taking hands along the set again. Now advance, bow and/or curtsy and retire again. And Charge!

Now Engage by taking your partner in ballroom position and Swing for sixteen counts. Now Reverse and Swing for sixteen counts counter- clockwise, and separate. And Here they come! The top couple slides down the set for eight counts, slides back up for eight counts, and then quickly slides all the way down the set and swings for a total of sixteen counts. While the head couple is charging down the second time, the rest of the set moves up one place and dresses lines.

Remember that the original Captains remain the Captains of the dance and call the orders, no matter what position they occupy in the set!

La Bastringue

The Call: Honored guests, please form a circle of couples to learn and dance La Bastringue.

The Instructions: Formation: A circle of couples, with the Followers on their partner's left.

All join hands and go into the circle "a double" (three steps and a close) and back again. Repeat. Circle to the left, (8 counts) and then to the right (8 counts) Note: Step is a chassez or slipping circle.

Take your partner in ballroom position and swing for 16 counts.

(Be sure to end with the Follower on the Lead's right, in skater's or promenade position)

Promenade for 16 counts (polka step or brisk walking step).

Reform the circle, with the Follower to the right of the Lead. You will observe that you now have a new partner.

Bohemian National Polka

Formation: A circle of couples. This may include customers who already know the dance but we do not teach or call the dance during the dance sets at Fezziwig's.

This choreography by Richard Powers is based on research by the Czech dance historian Frantisek Bonus (1919-1999). It is intended to portray the steps and forms of the original 1830s National Style of Polka from Bohemia, ten years before "polkamania" swept the world.

Prof. Bonus' long and complex collection of figures was intended for stage performance by a professional company. Richard's choreography is still challenging but is a social form danced for pleasure.

Music: Josef Strauss' "Feuerfest Polka" at 104 beats/min (slower than modern polkas).

An especially good recording is by the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra on the CD "Ein Straussfest". Telarc CD-80098.

Note: One bar of music equals the time of two walking steps or one polka step.

Introduction: 4 bars. Taking hands (Lead's right, Follower's left), honor partners:

1. Step back away from partner.

2. Close feet together, stand tall and look at partner.

3. Honor partner .

4. Rise and face line-of-direction (LOD).

- Promenade -

Position: Side-by-side, both facing LOD, Follower on the right, taking inside hands, raised to chest height. Lead's free left hand is akimbo (on their left hip). Follower's right hand holds skirt down, or may also place free hand akimbo. This convention of free hand placement is kept throughout.

Take 2 low, heavy Polka steps (step-close-step-hop) forward, beginning on outside feet.

Walk forward 2 elegant slow steps.

Rock forward on outside foot, honoring partner; rock back on inside foot. Repeat this 4-bar sequence a total of 4 times. On the last repeat, replace the rocking steps with two more walking steps, Lead leading the Follower into the next position.

- Chassez In and Out -

Half-close into open waltz position, without taking hands, both facing into the center. Follower's left hand is at the nape of the Lead's neck.

Chassez into the center (slide-close-slide); chassez back out, turning a quarter clockwise so that the Lead faces out of the room.

Take two turning Polka steps to revolve 3/4 of a turn, still without taking hands.

Repeat the 4 bars.

Take hands palm-to-palm (closed to waltz position) and chassez in and out as before, except turning a little more than a quarter because the Lead needs to be in backing position for the following pivots.

Turn as a couple with four slow pivot steps (two full turns, as in a Schottische, but without the hops). Take each step with a heavy down-up undulation.

Dudacka (doo-DAHTCH-ka) Polka step: Chassez in (slide- close-slide), look toward the outside wall and stamp outside foot to that side, looking down toward the stamp. Chassez out rotating a quarter CW and stamp toward LOD.

Take one complete turn of a Polka (2 bars), then cast away from partner, walking around in a tight circle four steps (Lead to their left, Follower to their right), to meet again.

- Pivots and Polkas -

Quickly take waltz position upon meeting and pivot four slow steps as before, traveling LOD.

Polka two bars (one full turn).

Repeat the four bars. End with the Lead facing LOD, placing their partner to face them.

- Redowacka (ray-doe-VAHTCH-ka) -

Position: Drop both hands to face partner at a close distance. Lead's (and possibly also Follower's) hands akimbo.

The Follower backs against LOD as the Lead advances LOD with the opening sequence of steps: Two polkas, two walks and two rocking steps in place. Twist the body with the steps (not in opposition) during the polkas, and twist somewhat during the rocking steps.

Follower backs the Lead with the same steps. Always begin with Lead's leftand Follower's right foot.

Take hands in waltz position: Repeat the 2 twisting polkas, but then pivot two full turns with 4 slow pivot steps, traveling LOD.

Repeat the 2 twisting polkas backing the Follower; pivot once around with 2 steps; then Lead turns the Follower under by raising their left (Follower's right) arm as they polka (not pivots) under with 3 quick steps R L R (to gain their leftfoot free for the next section).

- Chassez And Polka Tremblante -

Push off from the held hands into: Both chassez to their left side (slide-close-slide), and chassez back to the right side, without touching partner.

The Follower does 2 Polka Tremblante steps turning to their left, traveling LOD. (Polka Tremblante is a polka with small steps where the body bounces down and up with each step and hop.) Meanwhile the Lead walks forward 4 short steps, clapping boldly 4 times.

Repeat chassez and polka tremblante pursuit.

The Lead drops strongly to one knee (either one) and claps 15 times (8 plus another 7) as the Follower does 7 polka tremblante steps in a large counter-clockwise circle around him. Lead watches Follower as they circle the Lead. The Follower only travels 3/4 of this circular path, ending on the outside of LOD, facing the Lead. Lead rises to face the Follower as Lead claps the last time as Follower steps two steps in place R L (to gain their R foot free for the next part).

- Transition -

Taking closed waltz position, polka one full turn (2 bars) and cast away with four steps, as done at the end of Part 2.

- Repeat from the top -

Take inside hands and repeat parts 1 (without the introduction), 2 and 3 only.

Final honors: 1. Release from waltz position, keeping Lead's left (Follower's right) hand, and step back away from partner. 2. Close feet together, stand tall and look at partner. 3. Honor partner. 4. Rise.

Choreography and description by Richard Powers © 1986, 2003 Richard Powers

Ballroom Etiquette
Polka

We dance a pleasant, moderate tempo polka, or Polka Francaise, as it was called back then, as opposed to the much faster Polka Schnell so beloved by the later 19th century Germans and Viennese. Leaders especially are advised to keep their steps small and elegant, while followers should take care to support their own weight and to assist their partners in turning (Whoever has the inside track needs to take a slightly longer step to manage a smooth, easy turn). The hop in the Polka Francaise is gentle and small - almost effortless.

The long, bounding steps of the dance we affectionately call the “19 Year Old Polka” are appropriate only in an uncrowded ballroom and only when both partners have sufficient stamina to sustain it.

While open polka and skater’s polka as well as a half-ballroom position (used in Part 1 of “Bohemian National Polka”) are all acceptable variations and antidotes to dizziness, a half-ballroom position will support your partner far better than an open polka. The flirtatious Coquette figure (in which the couple separates and chases each other) is charming, but not appropriate on a crowded ballroom.

Cinderella Waltz

The Call: Honored guests, please take partners and form longways sets to learn and dance the Cinderella Waltz.

Tune: "My Love is Like a Red, Red Rose"

Formation: Longways country dance for as many as will.

First Follower and Second Lead advance two right waltz steps diagonally in towards their corner. Then two left waltz steps diagonally in, ending face to face. Take a cross-hand hold and turn once and a half around, ending up in opposite places.

First Corners (First Lead and Second Follower) do the same.

All take hands and waltz down the set for three counts. On the fourth count, change places without letting go of hands, turning the Followers under, and end facing up the set.

Waltz up the set three counts, then fall back to place.

Right hand star for four counts, then left hand star back to place.

It's East to Say Goodbye

The call: Honored guests, please take partners and form a circle of couples to learn and dance It's Easy to Say Goodbye Waltz Mixer.

All couples face the line of dance, holding inside hands.

4 regular steps

4 open waltz steps

Lead turns the Follower with an under the arm turn

Couple holds both hands facing each other

Forward and back for 2 waltz steps

Couple goes around one time in a circle

Duke of Kent part

Right hand in Right, forward and back and change places

Left hand in Left, forward and back and change places

6 closed (rotary) waltz steps.

Follower advances to next Lead

Lead awaits next Follower

Dance starts all over again.

Grand March

The Call: Honored guests, please take partners and follow the Lead Couple (add their names!) for a Grand March.

The step is simply walking in time with the music and the dance simply involves following the lead couple in a series of patterns that will either be called or demonstrated. Nothing could be easier! Keep alert and pay attention and you’ll be fine.

March Notes:

* If the line of couples is already long enough to extend half-way around the ballroom, please don't join in.

* The first two couples in a Grand March should be experienced Fezziwig couples. The third and fourth couples should INCLUDE an experienced Fezziwigger!

* We do not do tunnel, bridge, or dip-and-dive figures in Grand Marches and Reels at Fezziwig’s. EVER. These figures are painful for people with back problems and can cause painful and embarrassing accidents (anything from earrings caught in false curls to earrings caught in real curls!).

* Pay attention to the figures yourself and guide your partner attentively.

Lady Jane's Etiquette Quiz
Mazurka Waltz

There are a variety of beautiful mazurka waltz variations that can be done to "mazurka" music and all of them are fine: The polka mazurka, the polka redowa, the Varsouvienne, La Kostka, and even the redowa itself are the most popular and will be taught in the Dance 2 and 3 workshops at Dickens Fair.

But the trick to dancing mazurka waltzes successfully is to vary your steps so that you are not constantly doing the same step over and over. This lack of variety is exhausting to your partner, ergonomically incorrect, and really tedious for the audience to watch. It is not only acceptable but perfectly correct to alternate plain rotary waltz steps with your mazurka waltz steps and it's also perfectly acceptable to do "open mazurka" or "open redowa" steps as a variation.

Finally, if either you or your partner is inexperienced in these exotic dances, there is absolutely nothing wrong with simply waltzing to a mazurka waltz. Better to dance a graceful waltz than an awkward polka mazurka or redowa.

Dressed Ship

The Call: Honored guests, please take partners and form long ways sets to learn and dance the Dressed Ship.

Tune: "The Dressed Ship"

Formation: Longways country dance for as many as will

Note: Second couple: Your job is to get out of the way of the First Couple whenever the First Couple travels up or down the set. And, Leads: Whenever you lead your partner up or down the set, please offer them your hand.

Second Corners (First Follower and Second Lead) set toward each other (right and left), then take four small steps back. Then two-hand turn all the way back to place.

First Corners (First Lead and Second Follower) do the same.

In 8 counts: First Couple Casts off into second place, while the Second couple takes hands and leads up into first place.

All: Set to partners (right, then left) and Leads, turn your partner under your right arm.

(Turn them in place. Do not change places, as in "The Duke of Kent's Waltz." ).

In 8 counts: First Couple casts up into first place while the Second Couple takes hands and leads down into second place, the all set to partners (right, then left) and while First Couple leads down, with the Lead twirling the Follower under as they travel, the Second Couple casts up into first place.

Second Couple Note: Just remember that you need to progress UP the set at the end of the dance. That way you'll remember to cast UP instead of leading DOWN.

Jolly Dog's Polka

The Call: Honored guests, please take Your Favorite Partner and come forward to Learn and Dance the Jolly Dog Polka.

The Instructions: Now this dance is really quite simple. Most of it is just a polka and can be danced in either open or closed position, but at times the music will stop and change. At this point you stop, place your hands on your hips and sing a little song "Fa la la, Fa la la, etc," while setting first to the right and then to the left thusly (demo set, right and left); then sing "Slap, Bang (demo Clap own hands and gently clap hands with partner), here we are again, here we are again, here we are again. Slap, Bang, here we are again, What jolly dogs are we!" and turn single, (demo turn)", and change partners thus (take the NEAREST new partner) and polka some more. Any questions? No? Then let us begin.

If you find yourself without a partner during the partner change, Lost- and-Found is in the center. Fear not. You will be rescued.

The Reel

The Call: Honored guests, you don’t need a partner to learn and dance The Reel.

A follow-the-leader reel is a lot like a Grand March except that there is only one leader (usually aided and abetted by the second and third dancers in the line) and the line is single file. No partners are required. While the music is usually a lively Scots or Irish reel, the pace of the follow-the-leader reel is a brisk walk for the safety of the many children who inevitably join in.

Reel Notes:

* Please do your best to keep the pace to a walk and to discourage grapevines and crack-the-whip figures.

* Do your best to look after the children in the line.

* If you are not dancing in the reel line, you may create creative “obstacles” of various kinds to help the leader keep the reel from going too fast.

* Do not make “low bridge” figures. No one should be forced to bend or stoop.

 
Schottische

The schottische is a pleasant, easy dance which can be danced in either open or "closed waltz" position. The most delightful version is perhaps the Military Schottische, in which the couple dances Part 1 in open position (step, step, step, hop, step, step, step, hop), but assumes closed waltz position for Part 2 and executes four turning step hops. The alternate schottische step (Step-close-Step-hop) is also elegant and appropriate, though harder to teach the customers.

We generally teach the customers to dance the entire dance in open position first before introducing the turning step hops. There are a variety of fun variations on the open schottische which the customers also enjoy, though we discourage any variations that block traffic or have the potential to cause collisions in a crowded ballroom (particularly "The Genuflection," in which the leader suddenly drops to one knee and guides their partner to dance four step hops around them.

The key to survival in the schottische is to keep the hops small, even, and almost invisible. Big hops are ungraceful and inappropriate unless you're dancing with a particularly lively child partner. But for the sake of your knees and ankle, please keep your hops low at all other times!

Duke of Kent's Waltz

The Call: Honored guests, please take partners and form long ways sets to learn and dance the Duke of Kent's Waltz.

The Instructions: Long ways duple minor set (Take hands four from the top). Every step is waltzed.

First & Second couples right hand star (4 waltz steps around) and left hand star (4 waltz steps around).

Second couple stands still & looks elegant while the First couple takes both hands and does 2 chassez (slide) steps down the set, 2 chassez steps up the set and casts off while Second couple takes inside hands and waltzes up into the First Couple's place.

All: Giving right hands, waltz balance "in", then "out" and change places turning the Follower under. Repeat, but giving left hands.

Everyone turn their Right Diagonal (the person diagonally to their right) all the way around by the right hand. (Hint: The Followers look "up" the set to the Leads while the Leads look down the set to the Followers.)

Note that there will be a Lead at the bottom of the set and a Follower at the top of the set who do not have a right diagonal to dance with.

Then everyone turns their own partners by the left hand.

Waltz Veleta

The call: Honored guests, please take partners and form a circle of couples to learn and dance the Veleta Waltz Mixer.

Formation: A circle of couples (Follower on the Lead's right)

In open waltz position (holding inside hands) waltz 6 steps forward along the line of dance.

Face, take both hands, and chassez (slide-close-slide).

Change directions and do all this AGAINST line of dance.

Taking ballroom position, do two waltz turns and slide-close-slide.

Then do two more waltz turns and Lead (raising their left hands) turn their partner under their arms and gently send them forward to the next Lead.

Leads must, of course, immediately turn to offer a hand their new partner. It takes some multi-tasking!

Notes:

1. Technically, you should say "Chassez, chassez" instead of slide-close-slide but modern dancers don't necessarily know that term. "Slide-Close-Slide" is a better call.

2. And, of course, the two "waltz turns" are actually just half-turns but, again, modern dancers don't necessarily think in those terms!

Sellinger's Round

The Call: Honored guests, you don't need a partner to learn and dance Sellinger's Round.

The Instructions: Please join hands in a circle (pause). Now this dance is very simple. First, join hands and slide eight steps to the left (demo slipping step) and then eight steps to the right. Next, drop hands and take three steps towards the center, clap twice, three steps back, and clap twice (demo). Now we take a setting step to the right, then to the left (demo) and turn ourselves around (It's a right turn, so just follow your own right shoulder!). That was so much fun we do it again: One, two, three, clap, clap. One, two, three, clap, clap. To the right, To the left, and turn yourself around.

 
Galop

The Victorian galop or galopade is a fast but simple dance and the only step is a series of sliding (“chassez”) steps and closes. The usual pattern is “slide, slide, slide, half-turn. slide, slide, slide, half-turn.”

There is no heel-toe step in the galop (The Gaskell galop, though fun, is a modern invention) and the dance NEVER reverses directions. That would be dangerous, especially at high speeds. The galop can be graceful and fun if the leader measures their steps to suit the length of their partner’s stride. The galop can be done as a ‘follow-the-leader” dance and can be danced in open or “Side Saddle” position, but because the galop is exhausting for most people over the age of 14, dancers are advised to pause occasionally for rest (taking care, of course, to protect your partner as you withdraw to the side).

Variation: The Esmeralda

Named after the Romani heroine of Victor Hugo’s “Hunchback of Notre Dame,” the Esmeralda is a lively, fun variation on the polka. The pattern is slide, slide, slide, turn, slide, slide, slide, turn, followed by two polka turns. The only caveat: Don’t dance this variation too many times in a row or you will exhaust your partner.

Flowers of Fezziwig's

(Fezziwig Version of “The Flowers of Edinburgh”)

The call: Honored guests, please take partners and form three-couple sets to learn and dance the Flowers of Fezziwig

Formation: Three Couple Sets.

Note: This can be danced Skip-Change, Reel Step, or Polka Step (or Skipping or even a brisk walk!). The dance is essentially a solo for the First Couple. Fortunately, each couple will eventually become First Couple!

Part 1: The First Follower casts off, pursued by the First Lead, and dances all around the set until the Follower is in their partner's place. At the bottom of the set, their partner "cheats" by taking a short cut up the middle and ends up in the First Follower's place. The First Couple then sets to each other (right and left)

Part 2: The First Lead, pursued by the First Follower, casts off and dances all around the set until the Lead is back in their original place. At the bottom of the set, the First Follower "cheats" by taking a short cut up the middle and ends up back in their original place. The First Couple then sets to each other (right and left)

Part 3: The First Couple takes inside hands (note: the Scots take right hand in right) and lead down the middle (8 counts), turn swiftly, and dance back up to the top.

Part 4: All three couples take two hands and do a full clockwise turn. The First Couple then casts off into last place while the Second and Third Couples take inside hands and lead up into First and Second place, respectively.

And the dance starts all over again, this time with a new First Couple! The dance is usually danced through 6 to 9 times. But NEVER just 3 times through!

 
The Congress of Vienna Waltz

The Call: Honored guests, please take partners for the Congress of Vienna – a patterned waltz.

Part A: Partners bow to one another. Couples do an open waltz for four bars, beginning with opening forward and closing together, opening again and closing again. Then take closed waltz position and turn for 10 bars. Repeat the open and closed section for four bars and repeat the closed turning waltz for 10 bars. Then do 8 bars of open and closed followed by 8 bars of closed turning waltz.

Part B: Partners take two hands with the Lead lowering their right hand and raising their left hand to turn into a window without dropping hands. The Lead draws the Follower's right arm in front of the Lead. The couple then walks around each other for 4 bars. Partners unwind and turn the opposite way in 4 bars. The couple then walks around each other for 4 bars. The couple then unwinds.

The Lead leads his Follower around to the left. The Follower takes the Lead's left hand in their left hand and walks around their back, finishing by taking right hand in right hand. This takes 4 bars. The Lead pivots backwards while the Follower walks forward for 4 bars. The Follower then goes back to the other side of the Lead while the Lead remains stationary, offering their left hand outstretched. This takes 4 bars. The Lead pivots backwards while the the Follower walks forward for 4 bars.

The first window is then repeated and unwound into open position to repeat part A.

Generally Part A is played 3 times and Part B is played twice with the final part A ending in a bow.

Note: The Congress of Vienna is NOT a demonstration dance. It is easier to lead an inexperienced dancer through than 3 minutes of traditional rotary waltz. It can be led equally well from the Lead or Follower position. It is danced multiple times a day, so please don’t save it for your favorite partners; share it with everyone!

 
 
Garden Gate Waltz

The Call: Honored guests, please form a circle of couples facing couples to learn and dance the Garden Gate Waltz.

The Instructions:

Formation: A circle of couples facing couples

Note: Every step is waltzed.

Take hands in your set of four. Waltz-balance forward, then back. Drop your partner's hand and Leads swing the other Follower into partner's place. Leads do not move during the swing.

Repeat three more times, ending back in original places.

Join hands with the other couple in a right hand star and waltz around (4 waltz steps), then do a left hand star (4 waltz steps) to return to home. Note: The Followers' hands should be on top.

Taking inside hands with your partner, waltz two small steps forward and two small steps backward. Then waltz forward (4 waltz steps), dropping hands and letting the Followers pass through the middle. Waltz forward until you meet the NEXT couple in line.

Bow to your new opposite couple

     
 
Golden Slippers

The call: Honored guests, please take partners and form four couple sets to learn and dance Golden Slippers.

(Tune: “Golden Slippers” or “Le Russe Quadrille”)

Eight count bow and curtsy to partner, eight count bow and curtsy to corner.

Leads cast behind their partner to their partner’s corner (the follower to the lead’s right);

Balance (set) in and out, then swing (an 8-Count Swing).

Leads cast back to their partner, balance in and out, then swing (an 8-count Swing)

First couple continues swinging for 16 counts (Everyone else admires them!)

First couple promenades around the inside of the set for 16 counts

Drawers figure: Heads change side turning as a couple, 1st couple going through the middle first, the 2nd couple going through the middle to return to place.

Then repeat the Drawers figure (“That was so much fun that we do it again!”).

Chorus: Everyone take hands and do a slipping circle to the left for 16 counts.

Promenade back to place in 16 counts.

Begin again with Leads casting behind their partners. This time the second couple are active, doing the long swing and promenade, and second couple goes through first on the drawers figure.

On the third time through the third couple is active, going through the fourth couple first on the drawers figure, and the final time through the fourth couple is active, going through the third couple first on the drawers figure.

     
 
Lancers' Quadrille

Please note that both the head couples should know the dance, and the first couple should continue calling the dance throughout.

We generally don't have time to teach the dance, but instead attempt to teach it on the fly.

Please note that the Lancers was danced for over 100 years, and went through many different variations. A customer may think they know it, but the version they know may be different to the one we dance.

The call: Honored guests, please take partners and form 4 couple sets to dance the Lancers Quadrille.

- 1st Figure -

Eight count bow and curtsy to partner, eight count bow and curtsy to corner.

Heads advance and retire. Heads turn two hands with opposites.

Drawers figure: Heads change side, 1st couple going through the middle first, the 2nd couple going through the middle to return to place.

Chorus: Everyone does right shoulder siding with corner, then two hand turn with corner.

Heads repeat, with 2nd couple going through 1st on the drawers figure.

Sides do the figure twice, with 3rd couple going through first on the drawers figure the first time, and the 4th couple going through firt the second time.

- 2nd Figure -

Eight count bow and curtsy to partner, eight count bow and curtsy to corner.

Heads advance and retire. Head Leads put Followers into the circle back to back (so that the four members of the head couples form a line). All members of head couple slide to the right, then back.

Head couples do a two hand turn back to place, sides splitting apart and falling into lines.

Lines advance and return.

Two hand turn with partner back to place.

Heads repeat the figure, then sides do it twice.

- 3rd Figure -

Eight count bow and curtsy to partner, eight count bow and curtsy to corner.

Heads advance and retire. Heads advance and do a slow bow and curtsy.

Leads fall back as Followers take right hands. Side Followers enter circle and take right hands (Head Followers on top). Followers do right hand star as Leads circle them in the reverse direction.

All reverse - Followers left hand star to the right as Leads circle back to place and assist their partner back to place.

Heads repeat.

Sides do the figure twice.

- 4th Figure -

Very short bow and curtsy to partner.

Chorus: Grand chain (rights and lefts) around the circle. Brief bow and curtsy halfway around as you meet your parter, then bow and curtsy when you get back to place.

1st couple takes promenade position and travels around the circle, back to place, facing out of the circle.

3rd couple falls behind 1st couple, 4th couple behind them, 2nd couple remains in place.

Leads slide to the right four counts, while Followers slide to the left. All balance forward and back.

All slide back to place. 1st couple splits and casts to the bottom, everyone following. 1st couple leads up. Form lines of Leads facing Followers, advance and retire, and two hand turn partner back to place.

Chorus: Grand chain.

Repeat the figure, with 2nd couple active. 4th couple falls behind them, then 3rd, with 1st couple remaining in place.

Chorus: Grand chain.

Repeat the figure, with 3rd couple active. 1st couple falls behind them, then 2nd, with 4th couple remaining in place.

Chorus: Grand chain.

Repeat the figure, with 4th couple active. 2nd couple falls behind them, then 1st, with 3rd couple remaining in place.

Take ballroom position with parter and gallop around the set, turning as a couple as you reach each new position.

Repeat the gallop around the set.

Bow and curtsy to partner, bow and curtsy to set.

     
 
Lord Byron's Fancy

The Call: Honored guests, please take partners and form long ways sets to learn and dance Lord Byron's Fancy.

Long ways duple minor set. Take hands-four from the top.

The top Follower beckons to the second Lead and backs away from them. The Lead follows the Follower on the diagonal. Then the Lead beckons the Follower as they fall back to place. They take two hands and turn around once to place. The top Lead beckons to the second Follower as they back away. The Follower follows the Lead, then beckons back to place and they return, taking two hands and turning around once to place.

The two Leads take elbow in elbow and dance through the center of the Followers, casting around their own Follower and back to place.

Each couple then does a clapping routine. Clap your own hands together, then slap your partner's hand right hand to your right. Clap your own hands together again and slap your partner's left hand to your left. Repeat. Then top couples cast around to the second couple's place while the second couples walk up to the first couple's place.

Repeat the dance within your new four couple set.

     
 
Mr. Pickwick's Fancy

Formation: Long ways, duple minor country dance set for as many as will. Steps: Polka-step, skip-change step, or jig step (or a brisk walking step!).

First & Second Couple: Right hand star, left hand star. First Couple down the middle (6 steps) Turn as a couple (2 counts) Charge up the set and cast around the second couple into second place. First Couple is now "improper" (on the wrong side) and progressed.

Holding hands along the line, all set twice (Using any setting steps you like: English jeté boureé, Scots pas de bas, Irish rise & grind, etc.)

8 counts: First & Second Couple take hands four and circle half-way around. 8 counts: First & Second Couple "around the house" (Note: There is plenty of time for this last figure and even time for flourishes).

     
 
Northdown Waltz

The Call: Honored guests, please take partners and form long ways sets to learn and dance the Northdown Waltz.

Form long ways sets for as many as will. Every step is either waltzed or waltz-balanced

A1 1-4 SECOND corners (first Follower and second Lead) join right hands, balance forward and back, then change places. 5-8 First corners (first Lead and second Follower) do the same. 1-8 Repeat A1 to places B 1-8 First Couple take inside hands, lead down the center and lead back to 2nd place, 2nd couple moving up (stealing the First Couple's original place!). C 1-8 - First and Second Couples do an 8-count waltz poussette (counterclockwise) to their progressed places

Explanation of the Waltz Poussette Figure: First & Second Couples take two hands (with partners) and waltz-poussette around each other in eight counts). This is a kind of dos-a-dos for couples: The First Couple begins with the First Lead pushing and the First Follower pulling while the Second Couple begins with the Second Follower pushing and Second Lead pulling.

By the time the waltz poussette section ends, the First & Second Couples end in their progressed places, with the Second Couple above the First Couple.

     
 
Sir Roger de Coverley

The Call: Honored guests, please form four or five couple sets to learn and dance Sir Roger De Coverly.

The Instructions: Take hands along the lines, step forward, bow and/ or curtsy, and step back. That's the first and last time we do that.

Now we start with the top Follower and the bottom Lead, step forward, bow and/or curtsy. The top Lead and bottom Follower do the same. Top Follower and bottom Lead turn by right hands. The top Lead and bottom Follower do the same. Repeat by left hands, both hands, and no hands.

Next comes the fun part called lacing the boot. The top couple cross by right shoulders and go behind the next couple, and so on down the set, on reaching the bottom they take hands and slip up to the top, cast to the outside, walk to the bottom of the set while the rest follow, make a bridge* for the couples to go under, and we start again with a new head and foot couple.

* Please do not make a closed bridge that forces the other couples to stoop under it. This maneuver can be painful for anyone with a bad back. Instead, make your bridge a nice open arch that the other couples can easily walk under!

     
 
Soldier's Joy

The Call: Honored guests, please form a circle of couples facing couples to learn and dance Soldier's Joy

The Instructions: Danced in a circle of couples facing couples. Note that the dance is similar in its progression to the Spanish Circle Waltz.

Step: The step can be a lively walking step or a polka or skip-change step.

Forward and back (8 counts)

Forward and turn your opposite by two hands all the way around (8 counts)

Swing your partner (16 counts)

Followers' Chain (16 counts)

Forward and back (8 counts).

Forward and pass on through to the next couple, allowing the Followers to pass through the middle (8 counts).

Bow briefly to your new couple and proceed to dance the figures with them

     
 
Spanish Circle Waltz

(Also called the Sicilian Circle Waltz)

The Call: Honored guests, please form a circle of couples facing couples to learn and dance the Spanish Circle Waltz.

The Instructions:

Formation: A circle of couples facing couples

Note: Every step is waltzed.

Facing your corner (the Follower or Lead who is NOT your partner), waltz-balance forward, then back and change places, turning the Follower under. Then, facing your PARTNER, waltz-balance forward, then back, and change places, turning the Follower under. Repeat!

Join hands with the other couple in a right hand star and waltz around (4 waltz steps), then do a left hand star (4 waltz steps) to return to home. Note: The Followers' hands should be on top.

Taking inside hands with your partner, waltz two small steps forward and two small steps backward. Then waltz forward (4 waltz steps), dropping hands and letting the Followers pass through the middle. Waltz forward until you meet the NEXT couple in line.

Bow to your new opposite couple!

     
 
Strip the Willow

The Call: Honored guests, Please take partners and form five or six couple sets for Strip the Willow.

The Instructions: The dance starts with the top couple turning by right arms one and a half times, the Lead then presents the Follower to the next Lead in the line who turns them by the left arm, and then the Follower turns with their partner by the right, and so on down the set. At the bottom is the Lead's turn to dance with the Followers, and they go up the set, always turning their partner by the right and others by the left. Upon reaching the top, they go down both sides of the set at the same time. When they get to about the third or forth couple the next couple should start their turn.

     

 

 

 



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